History


 

In 1987, a physician asked former Personal Care Products Council President Ed Kavanaugh how he could organize a “makeover” for a woman in cancer treatment who was experiencing dramatic appearance side effects. The woman was so depressed and self-conscious she would not venture outside her hospital room. Kavanaugh made some calls and was able to provide cosmetics and a cosmetologist – and the makeover transformed not only the woman’s look, but also her outlook. She felt happier, less burdened and laughed for the first time in weeks.

With such a profound result, the Personal Care Products Council recognized the opportunity for its industry to help more women maintain their confidence and self-esteem. Kavanaugh presented the idea to the Personal Care Products Council membership – the nation’s cosmetic industry leaders – who immediately offered funding and cosmetics. The American Cancer Society enthusiastically joined the effort, providing a vital national network to assist women seeking information and access to the program. Finally, the Professional Beauty Association | National Cosmetology Association (PBA | NCA) signed on as the third collaborator, encouraging its member cosmetologists to volunteer their services. The program – dubbed Look Good Feel Better – launched with two groups workshops at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York and Georgetown University’s Lombardi Cancer Center in Washington, D.C., in 1989.

Today, Look Good Feel Better group programs are held in every state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico using products donated by Personal Care Products Council member companies. Teen and Spanish programs, self-help mailer kits, online support, and a 24-hour hotline are also offered – as well as numerous independent licensed international Look Good Feel Better affiliate programs across the globe.
 

1987

  • The Cosmetic Toiletry and Fragrance Association (CTFA) establishes the Cosmetic Toiletry and Fragrance Foundation (CTFA Foundation) and begin developing the Look Good Feel Better concept.
     
  • Research is conducted to determine the basic content and concepts of the program.
     
  • The name "Look Good Feel Better" is chosen.
     
  • The DreamBall, supported by the cosmetic industry and hosted by the American Cancer Society donates half of the event's proceeds to Look Good Feel Better, initiating funding for the program.
     
  • CTFA Foundation forms collaboration with the American Cancer Society and the National Cosmetology Association.
     

1988

  • Look Good Feel Better introduces pilot programs in New York at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and in Washington, D.C. at Georgetown University's Vincent T. Lombardi Cancer Center.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better materials are developed including patient brochures, training brochures, informational materials, and implementation kits.
     
  • Research, development, and filming of the Look Good Feel Better patient video takes place.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better patient video wins CINE Golden Eagle Award for its excellence as a documentary/non-theatrical film.
     

1989

  • CTFA Foundation formally launches the Look Good Feel Better program in New York City.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better is declared on Capitol Hill.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better is officially introduced to the National Cosmetology Association membership at their annual convention in San Francisco, where the first national Look Good Feel Better certification training takes place.
     
  • CTFA member Clairol agrees to operate the Look Good Feel Better toll-free number for one year.
     
  • The Health Show features Look Good Feel Better in a five-minute segment, the first national TV show to cover the program.
     

1990

  • Look Good Feel Better begins operation of its toll-free number 1-800-395-LOOK (5665), through the American Cancer Society National Call Information Center.
     
  • Ann Landers' column advocates Look Good Feel Better to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
     
  • The first issue of the Look Good Feel Better newsletter is published to inform audiences about program activities and information.
     
  • Town & Country publishes a Look Good Feel Better magazine supplement and sets up an auction to raise funds for Look Good Feel Better.
     

1991

  • Look Good Feel Better launches its Spanish-language program Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor, at the Los Angeles County/USC Women's Hospital, and holds a magazine editor round table in New York to introduce the program.
     
  • The first Look Good Feel Better general information brochure is produced and distributed to the field.
     

1992

  • The American Society of Association Executives gives Look Good Feel Better the “Associations Advance America” Summit Award for outstanding contributions to American life.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better wins the Creativity in Public Relations Award (CIPRA), sponsored by Inside PR Magazine.
     
  • The Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) New York Chapter gives Look Good Feel Better the 1992 Big Apple Award in the Community Relations Category.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better launches a public service announcement campaign – Because No Woman with Cancer Should Have to Look It.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better is available in all 50 states for the first time.
     
  • The first annual Look Good Feel Better Outstanding Service Award ispresented to the American Cancer Society New York City Division.
     

1993

  • Fashion designer Oscar de la Renta unveils an original scarf design to benefit the Look Good Feel Better program.
     
  • Women in Communications, Inc., names the Look Good Feel Better 30-second television PSA winner of the 1993 National Clarion Award.
     
  • Miami and New York City launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     

1994

  • Look Good Feel Better implements the Volunteer Recognition and Award Program.
     
  • The QVC Network features the Look Good Feel Better /Oscar de la Renta scarf as part of a Mother's Day promotion.
     
  • Albuquerque, New Mexico, becomes the fourth city to launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     

1995

  • A Look Good Feel Better advertising supplement appears in Harper's Bazaar and Marie Claire.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better Teen Working Group meets in Atlanta, Georgia, to discuss preliminary steps for developing a program for teenagers.
     
  • San Antonio, Texas, becomes the fifth city to launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     

1996

  • Give with Your Heart, a 30-second PSA for television is released.
     
  • More than 240 teenagers participate in the Look Good Feel Better for Teens roll-out program.
     
  • San Diego becomes the sixth city to launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     
  • Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor is honored for its work in the Hispanic community by Moderna magazine.
     

1997

  • Look Good Feel Better opens a product warehouse in Atlanta, Georgia.
     
  • San Juan, Puerto Rico becomes seventh city to launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     
  • The CTFA Foundation receives Inside PR Magazine's Creativity in Public Relations Award (CIPRA) for the bilingual Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor campaign.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better receives the 1997 Breast Cancer Awareness Award from the Betty Ford Comprehensive Breast Center at Columbia Hospital for Women in Washington, D.C.
     

1998

  • Transformation, a 30-second PSA for television is released to 90 markets and is aired across the country.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better launches its Web site at www.lookgoodfeelbetter.org.
     
  • Washington, D.C. becomes the eighth cities to launch Luzca Bien Siéntase Mejor.
     

1999

  • Look Good Feel Better celebrates 10 years of serving women with cancer with a tour of 22 US cities in a customized 48-foot truck and trailer attracting national and local press coverage.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better releases the results of a Roper Starch survey of oncologists and female cancer patients that reports on how women suffering from cancer are dealing with the non-medical aspects of cancer – the emotional, social, and physical appearance side effects of treatment.
     
  • Former First Lady Nancy Reagan is the keynote speaker at the opening ceremony at the Los Angeles stop on the 10th Anniversary Truck Tour.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better initiates a national Look Good Feel Better train-the-trainer program for national, state, and area trainers.
     

2000

  • Look Good Feel Better develops a self-help video and interactive Web site (2bMe) for the Look Good Feel Better for Teens program.
     

2001

  • A Look Good Feel Better international meeting is held in London.
     
  • A new Look Good Feel Better print public service ad is created titled "The latest cancer treatments aren't always prescribed by doctors" is created.
     
  • A new 30-minute Look Good Feel Better self-help video – Look Good Feel Better – Just for You is created for women who cannot access a group program.
     

2002

  • A new Look Good Feel Better tabletop display is created in both English and Spanish.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better cosmetic kit box is redesigned.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better releases survey findings from Harris Interactive reporting that 86 percent of women cancer patients say that looking good helps them feel better and gives them more confidence to cope with their disease.
     

2003

  • Look Good Feel Better produces an updated orientation and training video for use in certifying new cosmetology volunteers.
     
  • CNN Headline News airs a story on Look Good Feel Better in December.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better Web site is redesigned and adds new features including program finder, press room, and information in Spanish.
     
  • A Look Good Feel Better for Men brochure is designed as a self-help piece that provides important tips for men dealing with the side effects of cancer treatment.
     

2004

  • Look Good Feel Better celebrates its 15-year anniversary.
     
  • In conjunction with the 15th anniversary, a national media campaign targets large cities such as Denver, Chicago, Philadelphia, and the District of Columbia in an effort to raise awareness of the program and its achievements.
     
  • The second international meeting of Look Good Feel Better is held in Paris, France.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better launches new public service print ad to expand awareness and celebrate 15 years of helping women cancer patients.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better for Men Web site at www.lookgoodfeelbetterformen.org is completed.
     
  • Long-serving Foundation Vice President Carolyn Deaver retires. Louanne Roark succeeds Deaver as vice president.
     

2005

  • Look Good Feel Better introduces a new tote bag to house Look Good Feel Better products.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better receives a 2005 Bronze Telly Award for "Kathleen's Story," a documentary video about a courageous woman's battle with breast cancer and her enthusiasm about Look Good Feel Better.
     
  • "Behind the Bash," featuring Look Good Feel Better and American Cancer Society's DreamBall, airs on the Food Network.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better self-help video becomes available online on the Look Good Feel Better Web site.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better Web site for men is translated into Spanish.
     
  • Online program evaluation is initiated.
     
  • Latina magazine hosts Look Good Feel Better program luncheon featuring actress Judy Reyes.
     

2006

  • Look Good Feel Better Week is initiated.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better hosts a magazine health and beauty editors breakfast in New York City as part of the first Look Good Feel Better Week.
     
  • ABCs Extreme Makeover – Home Edition features Look Good Feel Better in a four-minute segment about the program.
     
  • A CNN and CNN Headline News story about Look Good Feel Better airs nationwide.
     
  • The Look Good Feel Better for Teens program is introduced.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better partners with Glamour magazine for the 2007 Grammy Awards.
     

2007

  • Look Good Feel Better's media campaign reaches nearly 4.5 million views.
     
  • A Look Good Feel Better survey released in conjunction with Cancer Survivors Day reveals that 57 percent of women with cancer say their appearance affects the way co-workers treat them. Eighty-three percent say they are self-conscious about their appearance.
     
  • In December 2007, the Cosmetic, Toiletry, and Fragrance Association Foundation changes its name and is now known as The Personal Care Products Council Foundation.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better teams with CVS Pharmacy to educate CVS beauty advisors about Look Good Feel Better and to make program information available in select CVS stores around the country.
     

2008

  • The Look Good Feel Better Lifetime Achievement Award is given to Rose Reynolds honoring her 21 years of service to the program.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better hosts its first Look Good...Feel Better Volunteer Seminar at the National Cosmetology Association America's Beauty Show and Hair World 2008.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better releases a new workshop video called An Invitation to Look Good Feel Better.
     
  • Participant evaluation shows that 98 percent of participants would recommend Look Good Feel Better to others; 93 percent report Look Good Feel Better is useful or very useful in improving self-image.
     

2009

  • Look Good Feel Better releases the Hope is Beautiful public service ad series designed by Ogilvy Healthworld.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better launches its 20th anniversary Women of Hope Is Beautiful Campaign.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better partners with OPI, Dior Beauty, Yves Rocher, Facelogic Spas, the North American Hairstyling Awards and the National Cosmetology Association for cause marketing and awareness programs (current as of 4/29/09).
     

2010

  • Look Good Feel Better reaches 700,000 women served in the United States and more than 1.1 million women served worldwide.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better partners with Revlon, Elizabeth Arden, Clarisonic, Sexy Hair, Yves Rocher and NuFace, for cause marketing and awareness programs.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better introduces new print materials that will be used for the Look Good Feel Better women's program.
     
  • Look Good Feel Better launches its redesigned Web site.